love the noise of life

Primary Secondary Noise became the foundation of a new code. The red, green and blue of Primary Noise is used to encode a capitalised alphabet, via groups of the three colours. The cyan, magenta and yellow of Secondary Noise is used to encode a lower case alphabet, via groups of the three colours. In Love Life and Love the noise of Life the colour groups are presented as three consecutive bands of drizzled paint. The orientation of installation is designed to suggest the flow of letters and words with each letter flowing into the next and continuing from one word to another despite the separation imposed by the use of two panels. Presentation then becomes a factor. Here we see two alternatives, as separate unframed words (Love Life) and as one phrase framed as if a single outcome (Love the noise of Life). I am happy with either presentation, my choice would be finalised depending upon the exhibition space and the needs of the curator.

love and life (c) revad David Riley
love life (c) revad David Riley
love the noise of life (c) revad David Riley
love the noise of life (c) revad David Riley

Should you wish to spend the time, you can begin to understand the colour groupings used to define each letter. Or, you could just enjoy the aesthetic of drizzled code and the balance it creates between signal and noise. The outcomes are shown here in room 1 fake gallery as they await a suitable opportunity to be publicly exhibited.

As I write you can click through to see larger views here.

primary secondary noise

Two drizzle outcomes will be exhibited from Friday this week. Each outcome was made by drizzling acrylic paint onto shredded financial receipts on a reclaimed frame and panel. I consider the two outcomes to be one diptych, but they can equally be seen as individual. From one perspective, noise becomes code.

primary noise © revad david riley
primary noise © revad david riley
secondary noise © revad david riley
secondary noise © revad david riley

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five unit code journal

The five unit code concept spans seven years. The first time the idea appeared in a journal was (way) back in 2007, in a journal from my pre degree foundation course. One of many ideas I parked at the time as I pursued other threads.

5uc journal 2007 © revad david riley
5uc journal 2007 © revad david riley

Move on seven years and 5uc came to mind again. Here it is in a journal from the summer of 2014.

5uc journal 2014 © revad david riley
5uc journal 2014 © revad david riley

Quite a cursory sketch, but I had already rediscovered the 2007 journal and putting the two journals together gave me a basic plan of what to do next. As usual, the idea and plan was just a starting point, everything else happens as a response to the discoveries made during the making of an outcome.

I share this as an illustration of the importance of maintaining a good record of enquiry. My journals become particularly important when I am bereft of idea, when they often supply a much needed trigger to move me forward.